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COVID Coping: Issue No. 69

Self-reported mental health softens slightly and stress due to COVID-19 remains steady.

Outlook for the weeks ahead improves slightly, with fewer believing things will get worse.

Most vaccinated residents have access to and use their QR codes as proof of vaccination. However, one quarter still relies on their wallet-sized vaccination card that was completed when they got their shots.

Opinion on the provincial government’s performance handling the pandemic continues to deteriorate. Those not vaccinated disapprove of the government’s performance more than those vaccinated.

COVID Coping: Issue No. 68

Self-reported mental health improves slightly and stress due to COVID-19 reduces.

Outlook for the weeks ahead improves slightly, although close to one half still believes things will continue to get worse.

One half of those employed say their employer either requires proof of vaccination or will require this information in the near future, up from four in ten last week.

With the introduction of vaccination or negative COVID-19 test proof to enter certain businesses as of October 1, most residents have been either asked to provide such evidence or simply have not been to a business that requires this information yet. One in ten say they were not asked to provide proof at an applicable business.

Six in ten residents plan to gather with others for Thanksgiving this year. More than one in ten say that someone who has chosen not to be vaccinated will be in attendance, while another one in twenty say unvaccinated people have not been invited to Thanksgiving celebrations.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, we started sharing a few brief insights from our online community, SaskWatch Research®. As we monitor and trend the results by week, we will share the information with you as we get it.

COVID Coping: Issue No. 67

Self-reported mental health remains low and stress due to COVID-19 remains at record high levels this week.

Outlook for the weeks ahead remains poor.

Saskatchewan residents are very comfortable discussing their vaccination status with loved ones, colleagues and their bosses. Those not yet vaccinated are less comfortable sharing this information, although roughly one half is still very comfortable doing so.

Close to two thirds of those employed think it is appropriate for employers to know their vaccination status. Despite one half of those not vaccinated being comfortable discussing their vaccination status with their boss, few believe it is appropriate for their employer to know this information.

Four in ten say their employer either requires proof of vaccination or will require this information in the near future. One half believe this information will not be required.

More than half of vaccinated people say they have discussed vaccines with friends or family members who are not vaccinated. However, vaccinated people are split on whether this kind of discussion is effective at encouraging those not vaccinated to get the jab.

COVID Coping: Issue No. 66

Self-reported mental health remains low and stress due to COVID-19 remains high this week.

Although outlook for the weeks ahead remains poor, fewer anticipate things will get worse.

Concern over contracting COVID-19 is at a high of six in ten residents.

Almost nine in ten are concerned about hospitals being over capacity in the coming weeks due to COVID-19. This concern is markedly different between those vaccinated and those not vaccinated.

If hospitals run beyond capacity and need to decide between those who will receive care and who will not, two thirds of residents agree that vaccinated patients should be prioritized over those who choose not to get vaccinated. Not surprisingly, those who are not vaccinated strongly disagree with this approach.

Despite changes announced last week, opinions of the provincial government’s response to the pandemic in recent months remain low. Weak assessments are offered by both those vaccinated and unvaccinated.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, we started sharing a few brief insights from our online community, SaskWatch Research®. As we monitor and trend the results by week, we will share the information with you as we get it.

Let us know if you have any questions for Saskatchewan residents about COVID-19.

COVID Coping: Issue No. 58

Early during the pandemic, we had respondents use one-word answers to describe their mood. We brought it back this week to see how far we’ve come.

“Good” is a classic one-word way to describe one’s mood in Saskatchewan, and that hasn’t changed over the past year.

However, negative words have diminished or have disappeared altogether since last March.

Self-reported mental health and stress levels remain much the same as last week.

Optimism about the future remains at an all-time high.

First vaccination rates among adults continue to climb while second vaccination rates continue to advance quickly.

When looking at COVID-19 statistics, most residents continue to pay the closest attention to new daily cases. The proportion of the population vaccinated is the second most common statistic. Far fewer track daily death counts compared to early February.

Saskatchewan residents are excited to see public health restrictions lifted on July 11, particularly to be free of their masks. While many say they will remain cautious in public places, many are thrilled to see friends and family again:

Covid Coping: Issue No. 56

Self-reported mental health slides this week, although stress levels drop to near record lows.

A record two thirds of residents believe things will get better over the coming weeks. We have never seen this level of sustained optimism within the barometer.

Eight in ten adults report having received their first vaccine, and two in ten have had their second shot, double that of last week.

A strong majority of residents favour reopening plans being tied to the percentage of people vaccinated and approve the speed at which restrictions are being lifted, including those planned for July.

Comfort in engaging in social activities has risen slowly over the past two weeks. Going to a shopping mall, seeing extended family in the province and playing sports with others notice the greatest improvement.

For more information on the Saskatchewan COVID-19 Barometer, please visit https://insightrix.com/saskatchewan-covid-19-research-resource-centre/.

COVID Coping: Issue No 54

Self-reported mental health softens slightly while stress levels remain comparatively low this week.

Optimism for the weeks ahead reaches record heights, with six in ten believing things will get better and a record low of only four percent feeling things will get worse.

Opinions of COVID-19 vaccination rollout continue to be positive in stark contrast to the first four months of the year.

Six in ten residents believe COVID-19 vaccines are effective against current variants, yet only two in ten say they are confident vaccines will protect against future variants that may arise. Opinions vary sharply between those who have had a vaccine and those who have not.

Given the financial strains faced by many during the pandemic, claimed charitable giving during COVID-19 has declined.

For more information on the Saskatchewan COVID-19 Barometer, please visit https://insightrix.com/saskatchewan-covid-19-research-resource-centre/.

COVID Coping: Issue No. 52

Since the beginning of the pandemic, we have been tracking how Saskatchewan residents have been holding up. Here’s how people say they are feeling for the week of May 10, 2021.

Self-reported mental health and stress levels hold steady this week. Those who have received a COVID-19 vaccine tend to feel happier.

Optimism surges to record levels, with one half believing things will get better in the coming weeks. Those vaccinated are much more likely to hold this belief.

Opinions of COVID-19 vaccination rollout continue to improve, particularly in relation to progress in Saskatchewan.

Almost two thirds of adults say they have received a COVID-19 vaccine, and only one ten have no intention of getting the jab.

A greater proportion of those vaccinated report feeling safe, less stressed and a reduced chance of getting COVID-19. However, few feel like their lives are getting back to normal.

Support for the provincial government’s re-open Saskatchewan plan is high. Many suggest the plan brings hope, yet some are cautious given events happening in other jurisdictions and concerns that conditions may regress.

For more information, visit: https://insightrix.com/saskatchewan-covid-19-research-resource-centre/

COVID-19 Barometer – Issue No. 50

Since the beginning of the pandemic, we have been tracking how Saskatchewan residents have been holding up. We have been providing an infographic to break down the numbers each week. Here’s how people say they are feeling for the week of April 26, 2021.

Self-reported mental health rises and stress levels fall slightly this week.

One half of residents feel the weeks ahead will remain the same, and roughly equal proportions feel they will either get worse or get better.

Opinions of public health measures remain divided this week, largely consistent with recent weeks.

Opinions of COVID-19 vaccination rollout improve for the first time in four weeks.

The proportion of adult residents that have received a COVID-19 vaccine approaches one half. Vaccination rates are highest in northern Saskatchewan.

Comfort participating in various activities ranges notably among those who are vaccinated. While most are comfortable seeing immediate family or friends, few are willing to travel out of province or attending large gatherings either indoors or outdoors.

For more information about this publication, visit the Saskatchewan COVID-19 Research Resource Centre on the Insightrix website.

COVID COPING: Week 48

Here’s how people say they are feeling for the week of April 13, 2021.

Self-reported mental health and stress levels remain steady this week.

Outlook for the weeks ahead holds stable, with equal proportions feeling like things will either stay the same or get worse. Regina residents are less likely to feel things will get worse than those in other regions of the province.

Opinions of public health measures remain divided, with the largest proportion feeling measures should be tightened further. Regina and Saskatoon residents are more likely to support further restrictions.

One third claim to have received a COVID-19 vaccine, up from one quarter last week. Those vaccinated – or have plans to receive one soon – increase to more than four in ten. Regina leads the way on vaccination progress.

Summer vacation plans appear to be shaping up similar to last year, with most planning to stay close to home, take day trips, go to a recreational property, or vacation within the province. Few plan to vacation outside of Saskatchewan at this point.

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